THE EURO IS HERE TO STAY

 

READ EVERYTHING CAREFULLY BEFORE STARTING. This is an activity that you will start in class and complete in your free time. I suggest finishing the Internet part during Estudo Acompanhado. If you still don't finish, make a print of the article to finish at some other time. VIP(OINT): The reports should be ready to be presented to your classmates by Thursday, January 17th (9.A) and Monday, January 21st(9.B).

You will be working in groups. Each group will have 30-40 mins at the computer, so please organize yourselves as quickly as possible in order to get as much work as possible done. Each student will write the answers on his handout as well as the report. Finally, each group will choose a leader to present the report to the class.

While you are at the computer, your classmates will be doing a related task at their desks. You will do the same task when they replace you at the computer.

You will be evaluated individually on the Internet activity and on the related task. I will be monitoring each of you and will grade what you hand in. However, I would like each member of the group to evaluate him/herself and his/her colleagues honestly. Include this evaluation at the end of your report.

Please try to work as quietly as possible. Hope you enjoy the activity!

 

GROUP 1

You are going to look for general information about the launch of the Euro and the countries it will affect. To do so, click on "New day for Europe" and read the text. Then answer some questions about it and write a report based on your answers that you will present to the class.

1.   Click on Overview (on the right) to read the full article.

2.   While you are reading, use one of the following online dictionaries to look up any vocabulary you don't know or remember:

      a.   Merriam-Webster: http://www.m-w.com/dictionary 

b.   The American Heritage Dictionary: http://www.bartleby.com/61/

3.   You can also click on Glossary of terms to look up Euro-related vocabulary.

 

Questions on the text:

1.   When did the Euro start circulating officially?

2.   What is that day called? What does it mean?

3.   How many countries adopted the single currency that day? Name them.

4.   How long will their citizens have to adapt to the new "legal tender"? What does 'legal tender' mean?

5.   What is so special and significant about the change to the new currency?

6.   How many people does it affect?

7.   Are the first weeks a good or bad time for armed robbers? Why (not)?

8.   Do you agree that "Europe will never be quite the same after such a crucial step" or not? Justify your answer.

 

GROUP 2

You are going to look for information about the beginnings of the European Union. To do so, click on "Europe: Time of change" and read the text. Then answer some questions about it and write a report based on your answers that you will present to the class.

1.   Read the introduction (first 4 paragraphs) and Towards a European Union.

2.   While you are reading, use one of the following online dictionaries to look up any vocabulary you don't know or remember:

a.   Merriam-Webster: http://www.m-w.com/dictionary 

b.   The American Heritage Dictionary: http://www.bartleby.com/61/

3.   You can also click on Glossary of terms to look up Euro-related vocabulary.

 

Questions on the text:

1.   How old is the European Union?

2.   What kind of an alliance unites its 15 members?

3.   What is the Euro and when was it officially launched?

4.   Who was one of the first persons to refer to the idea of a broad European cooperation and when?

5.   When did the idea "gain practical expression"? Explain why.

6.   How many countries signed the Treaty of Paris of 1951? Name them.

7.   Which resources did this treaty unite? Why were these two industries chosen?

8.   In 1957 "The Six" signed another very important treaty in Rome. What community did it create? What was it better known as?

9.   Several countries joined the EEC later on. What kind of cooperation has that produced?

 

  GROUP 3

You are going to look for information about the Euro, its aims and what it represents in economic terms. To do so, click on "Euro here to stay" and read the text, answer some questions about it and write a report based on your answers that you will present to your classmates.

1.   Read the full article.

2.   While you are reading, use one of the following online dictionaries to look up any vocabulary you don't know or remember:

a.   Merriam-Webster: http://www.m-w.com/dictionary 

b.   The American Heritage Dictionary: http://www.bartleby.com/61/

3.   You can also click on Glossary of terms to look up Euro-related vocabulary.

 

Questions on the text:

1.   When did twelve European Union countries say goodbye to their national currencies? And what did they say "hello" to?

2.   Apart from the Euro, is there another significant world currency? If so, which?

3.   What is the aim of "the biggest currency conversion" ever in Europe?

4.   In practical terms, how does the arrival of the Euro simplify things for tourists and business people in the Eurozone?

5.   How is January 1, 2002 defined in the text? Explain what it means.

6.   Why was the introduction of the Euro "a huge task"?

7.   At the moment the European Union is made up of 15 countries. After 2004 eleven more countries may join in. How many people are we   talking about? How significant is this in economic terms?

8.   Do you think the Euro is here to stay "for richer or poorer, for weaker or stronger"? Justify.

 

GROUP 4

You are going to look for information about the European Union countries that are not a part of the Euro, why they chose to stay out and if there is the possibility of joining it later on. To do so, click on "Outside the Euro, looking in" and read the text. Then answer some questions about it and write a report based on your answers that you will present to the class.

1.   Read the full article.

2.   While you are reading, use one of the following online dictionaries to look up any vocabulary you don't know or remember:

a.   Merriam-Webster: http://www.m-w.com/dictionary 

b.   The American Heritage Dictionary: http://www.bartleby.com/61/

3.   You can also click on Glossary of terms to look up Euro-related vocabulary.

 

Questions on the text:

1.   Was the adoption of the single currency a decision of the people of the 12 nations involved or a decision of their governments?

2.   Which countries stayed out of the Euro zone?

3.   Did England decide not to adopt the single currency for a political or an economic reason?

4.   In which of these three countries was the decision to stay out a democratic one?

5.   Are both the governments of the United Kingdom and Sweden in favor of a referendum (popular vote) on this subject?

6.   Why doesn't Sweden have as strong feelings as the UK against the Euro?

7.   Observers say that Britain and Sweden may decide to join the Euro sooner if the change "goes smoothly". Think of how things have been going on in these first two weeks and give your opinion on this.

 

GROUP 5

You are going to look for specific information about some European Union members and the new applicants. To do so, click on "New day for Europe" and then on Interactive map (on the right) to answer some questions. Then write a report based on your answers that you will present to the class.

1.   Click on each country to look for the necessary information.

2.   While you are reading, use one of the following online dictionaries to look up any vocabulary you don't know or remember:

a.   Merriam-Webster: http://www.m-w.com/dictionary  

b.   The American Heritage Dictionary: http://www.bartleby.com/61/

3.   You can also click on Glossary of terms to look up Euro-related vocabulary.

 

Questions on the map:

1.   What are the two most populated countries of the European Union? What is the population of each?

2.   Which of these two countries has the most powerful economy?

3.    When did Portugal join the EU? Who joined at the same time?

4.   Name the two poorest countries of the EU. Are they different in terms of enthusiasm for the European Union? Explain.

5.   Which country has had an important influence in the development of the EU in spite of its small size? Which European bank is based there?

6.   There is another small country that is the home of the European Parliament. Name it.

7.   How many countries are 'in line' to join the EU? Name them.

8.   Which one is having the biggest problems with the EU? What kind of a relationship is there between them?

 

 

MATCHING VOCABULARY EXERCISE

 

Match the word on the left with the appropriate definition on the right.

 

1. applicant

2. coin

3. community

4. conversion

5. cooperation

6. currency

7. ECU

8. EU

9. eurozone

10. launch (euro)

11. mint = coin

12. note

13. print (money)

14. referendum

15. treaty

a. put into circulation

b. make a coin from metal; to convert metal into coins

c. a formal agreement between two or more states regarding peace, alliance, commerce, or other international relations

d. in an EU context, a country that has asked to become a member

e. a piece of metal money

f. a public vote on a national issue

g. the 12 EU countries in which the Euro has been adopted as the official currency; also called 'Euroland'

h. equivalent to European Union or the 15 countries that form this union

i. the process of changing from one currency to another: from euros to dollars

j. produce bank notes/bills

k. a piece of paper money; also called bill (AE)

l. abbreviation of European Currency Unit, which went out of use on January 1, 1999 when the Euro was created

m. metal or paper money that is in circulation in a country

n. the action of working together for a common purpose or benefit

o. a group of associated nations with common interests

 

January 2002

Teresa Almeida d'Eša

 

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